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Throughout education there is a large amount of pressure on students to perform, to reflect the things that they have learnt and to earn the grades that secure their futures and will look good on the establishment where they have undertaken their learning. Every year, students are subjected to examinations to test the knowledge they have gained throughout the educational year. It is important for students to listen, learn and revise in order for them to perform well during exams which will not only allow them to pass their courses and schooling but will eventually shape their futures.

The recent GCSE examinations have shown a significant drop in results with maths and science grades falling to an all time low. Students seem to be having great difficulty earning passable grades in these subjects, areas that have always been slightly more difficult than subjects such as English and History. They are core subjects and the fall in grades means the level of teaching and understanding is a concern.

The need for additional educational help is now more prominent than ever and the UK needs to take a leaf from the USA’s book and encourage its students to receive more help in certain areas in order to pass the subjects they have spent so long learning. America place a larger amount of emphasis on examinations and the need to pass, students is under more pressure but also have more opportunity for extra help. A math tutor in Fremont is one of the most commonly used sources of aid that helps American students to excel or simply pass the courses that plight their education and have a greater impact on graduation and acceptance into college courses.

The number of A* to C grades in the UK has fallen by 2% in comparison to the results achieved in 2012. One of the reasons behind this could be due to the increased specifications that the Science examinations call for, they are now far more challenging and students are expected to show a greater knowledge to simply pass the test. Maths have multiple entry systems which reduces the overall success of the subject as students no longer can excel in one mathematical area to weigh out the problems they may have with others. Instead, they are expected to have a reasonable understanding of each area in order to pass the subject as a whole.

A fall in results can have a negative impact on the school or college, if 40% of pupils do not achieve at least 5 GCSE’s, then educational bodies and inspectors such as Ofsted are called in to monitor and asses the school and the standard of education and learning that it offers.

The Government and educational bodies are now calling for reviews on the way students learn and the way examinations are structured to not only determine the reasoning behind the poor results but to ensure there is not a repeat of this issue in the future. Although exams are designed to test the knowledge of a student, they are not supposed to be designed to encourage students to fail, they need to be realistic and passable for some.

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Written by brandyellen

Brandy is a born and raised New Hampshire resident who loves to spend extra time laughing & smiling with her three children. Brandy runs multiple blogs & she loves to tweet daily and ramble on Facebook. Author, with her daughter, of Positive Girl - The Power of Your Thoughts Question about this post or something found within it? Read my Disclosure Policy as well as Terms of Use.

This article has 2 comments

  1. Rosey (999 comments)

    I’ve always wondered why math and science were the two grades least likely to have high scores.

  2. Kevin (1 comments)

    One of the reasons there has been a decrease in achievement is because the government has imposed a higher pass rate for students. In the 2012 Summer examinations, for example, the exam boards were forced to change the boundary level for grade C. The result was that less students passed. What this means is not a fall in standards of teaching, it means the bar has been raised. It also means a grade C from 2011 is not to be compared with a grade C from 2012 onwards – its more comparable to a D.