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Repairing cast iron with welding is difficult in itself, more so when the object to be repaired is valuable cast iron cookware. Thankfully, there are special solder rods and techniques you can use to make repairing cast iron cookware easier.

Cast iron cookware has a long history. They were particularly treasured in many homes during the early twentieth century. Even today, cast iron stands out from other materials used for cookware. With proper care and maintenance, pots and pans made from the urable material can last for a long time.

Cookware made from cast iron is also versatile. They can withstand high temperatures and can be used on an open fire as well as in a hearth or oven. The metal also distributes heat evenly and adds texture and flavor to the food.

It also provides users several health benefits. Trace amounts of iron
can be mixed in the food by using cast iron pots and pans, making it ideal for those with iron deficiencies. In a country where 60% to 70% of the population lack iron in their diet, the special characteristics of cast iron cookware can help many families meet their recommended daily dose of the nutrient.

Because of their value and the benefits they provide, it’s important to repair cast iron cookware when it cracks or breaks. Cast iron repair, however, is complicated due to the temperamental nature of the metal. Welds frequently crack again no matter how slowly and carefully the metal is cooled. Fortunately advances in welding tools, especially in the soldering rods, significantly reduce this behavior.

To repair cast iron cookware using welding tools, first heat it with
the torch until it turns a dull red, then apply the flux.  When the flux flows out, administer the rod with an oxyacetylene torch until the solder flows out flat.  A good soldering rod for torch welders is cadmium-free, food grade SSF-6 Silver Solder from Muggy Weld.
Next, grind or sand the weld to smoothen the area. Finally, let it cool and remove any residual flux. Remember to season
repaired pots and pans before use.

 

This is a guest post by Jane Wilkins

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Written by brandyellen

Brandy is a born and raised New Hampshire resident who loves to spend extra time laughing & smiling with her three children. Brandy runs multiple blogs & she loves to tweet daily and ramble on Facebook. Author, with her daughter, of Positive Girl - The Power of Your Thoughts Question about this post or something found within it? Read my Disclosure Policy as well as Terms of Use.

This article has 1 comment

  1. Robin (Masshole Mommy) (232 comments)

    My mother cooks with cast iron pots & pans and she swears by them. I always thought that they cooked too fast for me, but she loves them.